2016/17 FE Workforce Data Insights Series
Extract from the Analysis of the 2016-2017 Staff Individualised Record (SIR 25) data by Frontier Economics March 2018
Insight 1: The Gender Pay Gap


The FE workforce data report for SIR25 found that the gender pay gap across all staff and providers is 9.7% (in favour of men). As this is an aggregate gap, it does not take into account the jobs and qualifications of individual members of staff. For example, the SIR 23 report in 2014-15 found that most of the difference in pay between genders - particularly for teaching staff - was related to differences in job roles held by men and women.

The gender pay gap is just under 3% (in favour of men) for teaching staff. As mentioned above, previous analysis in SIR 23 suggests the this gap may be driven to a significant extent by the different subjects taught by men and women.

Below we look in detail at differences in median annual pay between genders. Please note that the Figure numbers relate to the full report. You can find details about the full report at the bottom of this article.

Figure 47 below shows that the gender pay gap is 9.7% across all provider types when looking at median pay (for full-time staff who were employed for the entire 2016-17 academic year). While colleges - the overwhelming majority of the sample - have a 10.3% gender pay gap, this is reversed in local authorities and other providers, where median pay for female staff is higher than for male staff. What are you doing what are you doing big 

Figure 47. Gender pay gap by provider type

Provider type

Median pay - male staff

Median pay - female staff

Male-female % pay gap

All providers

£29,904

£27,000

9.7%

Colleges

£30,244

£27,138

10.3%

Local Authorities

£25,505

£25,951

-1.7%

Independents

£26,000

£25,770

0.9%

Other providers

£19,143

£21,106

-10.3%

Source: Frontier Economics analysis of SIR 25 data

 

Figure 48 below shows that the gender pay gap has risen since SIR 21, although we observe a fall from 11% to 9.7% between SIR 24 and SIR 25. Specifically looking at college providers, the gender pay gap remained at just over 10% throughout SIR 23-25.
 
As discussed in the annex on data processing, however, these results for trends in annual pay must be interpreted with caution, given the changes in the quality and quantity of data received from providers over time - without carrying out a more in-depth econometric analysis controlling for changes in the sample of staff and providers between SIR 21 and SIR 25, it is not possible to interpret the changes over time as necessarily reflecting the reality for any individual or specific group of staff. While the results for each individual year are the most accurate we can estimate given the data available in each year, the comparison between years may have as much to do with the change in the sample of contracts and providers over time as with changes for any given staff member or provider. 

Figure 48. Gender pay gap, change over time

Year

Median pay - male staff

Median pay - female staff

Male-female % pay gap

SIR 21

£28,500

£26,500

7.0%

SIR 22

£28,500

£26,500

7.0%

SIR 23

£29,500

£26,500

10.2%

SIR 24

£29,000

£25,805

11.0%

SIR 25

£29,904

£27,000

9.7%

Source: Frontier Economics analysis of SIR 21-25 data

 

Below we look in detail at differences in median annual pay between genders, specifically for teaching staff. Figure 61 shows that the gender pay gap is 2.93% across all provider types when looking at median teacher pay (as above, this is only for full-time staff who were employed for the entire 2016-17 academic year). Colleges, local authorities, and independent providers all show a very similar gender pay gap for teachers (2.9% in favour of men), whereas median teacher pay at other providers is slightly higher for women. 

Figure 61. Gender pay gap by provider type (teaching staff only)

Provider type

Median pay - male staff

Median pay - female staff

Male-female % pay gap

All providers

£32,300

£31,400

2.93%

Colleges

£32,500

£31,600

2.95%

Local Authorities

£25,500

£24,800

2.86%

Independents

£26,000

£25,200

2.89%

Other providers

£26,300

£27,100

-3.04%

Source: Frontier Economics analysis of SIR 25 data

Note: to ensure comparability, we report the annual pay for full-time staff only, and only include pay for contracts in existence throughout the whole of 2016-17
 
Figure 62 below breaks down median pay by gender as well as by subject. The male-female gender pay gap is positive (i.e. males earn more) in 13 out of 17 individual subjects. It is important to note that the figures presented in Figure 62 do not account for any differences in age, provider type, region, experience, or other characteristics that may affect an individual's pay. In other words, a gap between the median pay of all males teaching a given subject and the median pay of all females teaching that subject should not be interpreted as necessarily suggesting differential pay for 'equivalent' individuals doing equivalent roles. To determine the gender pay gap on this basis would require a more in-depth study controlling for the multitude of factors (other than gender) that could influence an individual's pay.
 
Other than the subjects Community development and Family learning, which are excluded due to very low sample sizes, several other figures in Figure 62 rely on relatively small samples (in particular, Languages, Literature and Culture; Social sciences; and Education and Training). Is 

Figure 62. Median pay by subject and gender, teaching staff

Subject taught

Median pay - male staff

Median pay - female staff

Male-female % pay gap

Agriculture, horticulture and animal care

£31,000

£27,900

10%

Arts, media and publishing

£32,600

£32,200

1%

Business, administration and law

£33,900

£32,000

5%

Construction, planning and the built environment

£32,800

£32,500

1%

Education and Training (including initial teacher education)

£35,000

£33,400

4%

Engineering and manufacturing technologies

£31,800

£32,400

-2%

English (including literacy)

£32,500

£30,000

8%

Health, public services and care

£32,800

£31,100

5%

Humanities

£34,800

£32,200

7%

Information and communication technology (ICT)

£33,600

£32,700

3%

Languages, literature and culture

£32,700

£31,900

2%

Leisure, travel and tourism

£31,100

£31,200

0%

Mathematics

£31,500

£31,000

1%

Preparation for life and work

£27,900

£31,200

-12%

Retail and commercial enterprise

£31,600

£32,500

-3%

Science

£34,300

£32,800

4%

Social Sciences

£33,900

£34,600

-2%

Source: Frontier Economics analysis of SIR 25 data


Background
The annual FE workforce data report is the most comprehensive and independent source of data on the latest trends in demographics, staffing numbers and pay across all provider types in the Further Education (FE) and Training sector. The report provides valuable insights and robust data for practitioners, providers, and policy, to support decision-making. 
 
The quantity and quality of the SIR dataset has improved over time. For the 2016/17 academic year, information was gathered from 198 providers (compared to 175 for 2015/16) who provided returns on 72,104 staff contracts (compared to 66,016 for 2015/16). As well as FE, sixth form and specialist colleges, the dataset comprises local authorities, independent training providers and the third sector.
 
You can download a copy of the full 2016/17 FE workforce data report here.

 

 

Recent Data Insights

Tags